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Publication Metrics: Author Metrics

What are the metrics for authors?

The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar. h-index imageIt is based on the set of the author's most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications. h-indices can vary by source since the sources may not all include the same publications.

Advantages of the h-index:

  • Allows for direct comparisons within disciplines.
  • Measures quantity and impact by a single value.
  • Corrects  for the disproportionate weight of highly cited publications or publications that have not yet been cited.

Disadvantages of the h-index:

  • Does not give an accurate measure for early-career researchers.
  • Author name variant issues and multiple versions of the same work pose challenges in establishing accurate citation data for a specific author.
  • Does not provide the context of the citations.
  • Self-citations or gratuitous citations among colleagues can skew the h-index.

Read more about the h-index on the Metrics Toolkit

The RCR (relative citation ratio) is fundamentally an article-level metric but has been proposed as an alternative to the h-index to evaluate author NIH logoimpact. The RCR was developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Portfolio Analysis. The RCR makes use of a co-citation network, which means that when it assesses one paper it looks at the other papers that appear alongside it in the reference list. By doing this, it field-normalizes the number of times an article is cited. 

The RCR is calculated by dividing the number of citations a paper received by the average number of citations an article usually receives in that field. That number is then benchmarked against the median RCR for all NIH-funded papers. This allows articles to be assessed on the basis of their relevance in their own field, and highly influential articles will be recognized even if they are published in an obscure journal.

Read more about the RCR at the Metrics Tooklit

The g-index is an index for quantifying scientific productivity based on publication record (an author-level metric). It was proposed in 2006 by Leo Egghe.g-index image The g-index accounts for the performance of author's top articles, and helps to make more apparent the difference between authors' respective impacts.

How to Find Author Impact

1. Go to Scopus.

2. Search for author by name and institution.

Scopus image

3. From the results page, click on the name that matches the author of interest. If there is more than one entry for the author, you can select multiple entries. The h-index appears on this page but more information is available if you click "View citation overview."

Scopus name search

4. The citation overview can be exported or printed. Below the graph, it shows each published article with citations by year for the most recent 5 years.

Scopus citation overview

 

Be aware that not all h-indices are accurate!

h-indices can vary by source since databases include different journals in terms of subject coverage as well as volume of journals included.In addition, name variations can lead to inaccurate h-indices. We recommend confirming articles, utilizing database-specific author IDs, and attaching ORCiDs where possible. We also recommend checking h-index in both Web of Science and Scopus to identify potential issues with accuracy.

1. Go to Web of Science.

2. Search for author by name or ORCiD.

Web of Science search

3. You may get multiple results for an author or only one. If only one, the resulting page may be claimed or computer-generated, as below. The h-index appears on this page, or you can click on "full Citation Report" for more information.

Web of Science author record

4. The Citation Report can be exported or printed. Below the graph, it shows each published article with citations by year for the most recent 5 years.

Web of Science citation report

Be aware that not all h-indices are accurate!

h-indices can vary by source since databases include different journals in terms of subject coverage as well as volume of journals included.In addition, name variations can lead to inaccurate h-indices. We recommend confirming articles, utilizing database-specific author IDs, and attaching ORCiDs where possible. We also recommend checking h-index in both Web of Science and Scopus to identify potential issues with accuracy.

1. Go to iCite.

2. Search by author name or list of PMID(s) for the author. Note that searching by author name will inevitably include some false results by authors with similar names. A list of verified PMIDs will be more accurate.

iCite search

3. The analysis will show the weighted relative citation ratio (RCR).

iCite result

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